Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Biochemistry

NF-kappa B binding mechanism: a nuclear magnetic resonance and modeling study of a GGG –> CTC mutation

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Biochemistry - 30 Mar 1999

Tisné C, Hartmann B, Delepierre M

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 10194299

Biochemistry 1999 Mar;38(13):3883-94

We present the solution structure of the nonpalindromic 16 bp DNA 5’d(CTGCTCACTTTCCAGG)3′. 5’d(CCTGGAAAGTGAGCAG)3′ containing a mutated kappaB site for which the mutation of a highly conserved GGG tract of the native kappaB HIV-1 site to CTC abolishes NF-kappaB binding. 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies have been used together with molecular modeling to determine the fine structure of the duplex. NMR data show evidence for a BI-BII equilibrium of the CpA.TpG steps at the 3′-end of the oligomer. Models for the extreme conformations reached by the mutated duplex (denoted 16M) are proposed in agreement with the NMR data. Since the distribution of BII sites is changed in the mutated duplex compared to that of the native duplex (denoted 16N), large differences are induced in the intrinsic structural properties of both duplexes. In particular, in BII structures, 16M shows a kink located at the 3′-end of the duplex, and in contrast, 16N exhibits an intrinsic global curvature toward the major groove. Whereas 16N can reach a conformation very favorable for the interaction with NF-kappaB, 16M cannot mimic such a conformation and, moreover, its deeper and narrower major groove could hinder the DNA-protein interactions.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10194299