Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology

Myb-independent macrophages: a family of cells that develops with their tissue of residence and is involved in its homeostasis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology - 11 Oct 2013

Gomez Perdiguero E, Geissmann F

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24122769

Cold Spring Harb. Symp. Quant. Biol. 2013;78:91-100

In most metazoans, all tissues contain phagocytes “in residence,” generally termed “macrophages” in vertebrates. In contrast to myeloid cells produced continuously by the bone marrow (BM), tissue-resident macrophages develop during embryogenesis together with their tissue of residence, and persist in adulthood, independently of hematopoietic stem cells and the transcription factor Myb. They therefore represent an independent lineage from blood monocytes, dendritic cells, and monocytes/macrophages that are recruited to tissues during inflammation. Tissue-resident macrophage functions are yet to be completely defined. They all share the ability to scavenge toxic compounds, lipids, microorganisms, and dead cells and contribute to tissue remodeling, via phagocytosis and the production of growth factors. In contrast, the production of inflammatory mediators seems to be more associated with BM-derived cells. Tissue-resident macrophages and BM-derived myeloid cells thus differ in developmental origin and functions; the term “macrophages” could be reserved for Myb-independent-resident macrophages to avoid confusion. A genetic and molecular dissection of resident macrophage functions will reveal their roles in tissue metabolism and the maintenance of homeostasis independently of the extravasation of inflammatory leukocytes, and in the control of the recruitment of BM-derived cells in overt inflammation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24122769