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© Michel Huerre
Coupe histologique de foie de patient atteint d'une hépatite C chronique active avec infiltrat (opacité) folliculaire (lymphocytes) (Grossissement X 400). L'hépatite C chronique peut être à l'origine de cirrhose et cancer du foie
Publication : The Journal of investigative dermatology

Mutation and abnormal expression of the p53 gene in the viral skin carcinogenesis of epidermodysplasia verruciformis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of investigative dermatology - 01 Oct 2001

Padlewska K, Ramoz N, Cassonnet P, Riou G, Barrois M, Majewski S, Croissant O, Jablonska S, Orth G

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11676835

J. Invest. Dermatol. 2001 Oct;117(4):935-42

Patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis are prone to nonmelanoma skin cancers, due to an inherited abnormal susceptibility to the oncogenic human papillomavirus type 5. Genotoxic sunlight ultraviolet B radiations are likely to be a cofactor. Lesions of two human-papillomavirus-type-5-infected epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients collected during an 8 y period were retrospectively studied for p53 mutations in exons 5 through 8 by a polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism technique and/or by DNA sequencing of amplified exons. Mutations were detected in 11 of 26 (42.3%) specimens, including five (62.5%) squamous cell carcinomas, three (33.3%) Bowen’s carcinomas in situ, two (40%) actinic keratoses, and one (33%) benign lesion. The nine mutations characterized by sequencing were shown to be missense and to affect mutational hotspots in human cancers. Five were C–>T transitions at dicytidine sites considered as ultraviolet signature mutations. Two were transversions (C–>G and C–>A) at dicytidine sites and two were C–>T transitions at nondipyrimidine sites. A marked p53 immunoreactivity was disclosed in 72.7% of 11 invasive carcinomas, 55.6% of nine carcinomas in situ, 37.5% of eight actinic keratoses, and one of three benign lesions. This includes 81.8% of 11 specimens with a p53 mutation but also 50% of 14 specimens with no mutation detected. A dysfunction of the p53 gene is thus likely to play a part in epidermodysplasia verruciformis carcinogenesis, either due to ultraviolet-B-induced p53 mutations, as in nonmelanoma skin cancers in the general population, or involving other mutagens or mechanisms. The part played by human papillomavirus type 5 proteins expressed in epidermodysplasia verruciformis keratinocytes remains to be determined.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11676835