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© Institut Pasteur/Antoinette Ryter
Salmonella spp. Bactéries à Gram négatif, aérobies ou anaérobies facultatifs à transmission orofécale. Les salmonelles majeures (sérotype typhi et sérotype paratyphi) sont responsables des fièvres typhoïde et paratyphoïde chez l'homme uniquement ; les salmonelles mineures (sérotype typhimurium et sérotype enteritidis) sont impliquées dans 30 à 60 % des gastroentérites et toxiinfections d'origine alimentaire. Image colorisée.
Publication : AJR. American journal of roentgenology

MRI of macrophages in infectious knee synovitis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in AJR. American journal of roentgenology - 01 Jun 2010

Bierry G, Jehl F, Neuville A, Lefevre S, Robert P, Kremer S, Dietemann JL

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 20489072

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2010 Jun;194(6):W521-6

OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to prospectively evaluate macrophage imaging using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO)-enhanced MRI to depict bacterial knee infection in an experimental rabbit model.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Unilateral knee infection was induced by intraarticular injection of Staphylococcus aureus in eight rabbits. The contralateral knees were used as internal controls. After a mean interval of 3 days, two MRI sessions (3-T MRI) were performed before and 24 hours after IV administration of USPIO. The protocol included T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted spin-echo, and T2*-weighted gradient-echo images. A gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted sequence was also performed in the first session to optimize detection of synovial hyperplasia. MR data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively and compared with histopathologic findings (H and E stain and Perls Prussian blue stain). Signal-to-noise ratio changes after USPIO administration were compared using Wilcoxon’s signed rank test.

RESULTS: All inoculated knees presented infectious synovitis with intense infiltration of iron-loaded macrophages. In these infected knees, signal loss was determined visually and quantitatively on T1-weighted (p < 0.01), T2-weighted (p < 0.01), and T2*-weighted images (p < 0.01) 24 hours after USPIO administration, reflecting the presence of USPIO-loaded macrophages in the synovium. In contrast, no significant MR signal changes were observed in the control knees (p = 0.07-0.48), which presented a normal synovium without infiltration of iron-loaded macrophages.

CONCLUSION: Macrophage imaging using USPIO-enhanced MRI can depict infectious knee synovitis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20489072