Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : PLoS genetics

MITF – A controls branching morphogenesis and nephron endowment

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in PLoS genetics - 14 Dec 2017

Phelep A, Laouari D, Bharti K, Burtin M, Tammaccaro S, Garbay S, Nguyen C, Vasseur F, Blanc T, Berissi S, Langa-Vives F, Fischer E, Druilhe A, Arnheiter H, Friedlander G, Pontoglio M, Terzi F

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 29240767

PLoS Genet. 2017 12;13(12):e1007093

Congenital nephron number varies widely in the human population and individuals with low nephron number are at risk of developing hypertension and chronic kidney disease. The development of the kidney occurs via an orchestrated morphogenetic process where metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud reciprocally interact to induce nephron formation. The genetic networks that modulate the extent of this process and set the final nephron number are mostly unknown. Here, we identified a specific isoform of MITF (MITF-A), a bHLH-Zip transcription factor, as a novel regulator of the final nephron number. We showed that overexpression of MITF-A leads to a substantial increase of nephron number and bigger kidneys, whereas Mitfa deficiency results in reduced nephron number. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MITF-A triggers ureteric bud branching, a phenotype that is associated with increased ureteric bud cell proliferation. Molecular studies associated with an in silico analyses revealed that amongst the putative MITF-A targets, Ret was significantly modulated by MITF-A. Consistent with the key role of this network in kidney morphogenesis, Ret heterozygosis prevented the increase of nephron number in mice overexpressing MITF-A. Collectively, these results uncover a novel transcriptional network that controls branching morphogenesis during kidney development and identifies one of the first modifier genes of nephron endowment.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29240767