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© Cédric Delevoye
Cellules infectÈes par Chlamydia trachomatis. Les bactÈries se dÈveloppent dans une vacuole (rouge), ‡ proximitÈ du noyau de la cellule-hÙte (bleu). Ce compartiment interagit de faÁon Ètroite avec ceux de la cellule hÙte. Marquage vert= localisation d'une protÈine de l'hÙte, Vamp8, exprimÈe par transfection. Les Chlamydia sont, selon les souches, responsables de maladies sexuellement transmises, de cÈcitÈs, d'infections pulmonaires et pourraient Ítre impliquÈes dans l'athÈrosclÈrose.
Publication : The Plant cell

Metabolic effectors secreted by bacterial pathogens: essential facilitators of plastid endosymbiosis?

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Plant cell - 31 Jan 2013

Ball SG, Subtil A, Bhattacharya D, Moustafa A, Weber AP, Gehre L, Colleoni C, Arias MC, Cenci U, Dauvillée D

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23371946

Plant Cell 2013 Jan;25(1):7-21

Under the endosymbiont hypothesis, over a billion years ago a heterotrophic eukaryote entered into a symbiotic relationship with a cyanobacterium (the cyanobiont). This partnership culminated in the plastid that has spread to forms as diverse as plants and diatoms. However, why primary plastid acquisition has not been repeated multiple times remains unclear. Here, we report a possible answer to this question by showing that primary plastid endosymbiosis was likely to have been primed by the secretion in the host cytosol of effector proteins from intracellular Chlamydiales pathogens. We provide evidence suggesting that the cyanobiont might have rescued its afflicted host by feeding photosynthetic carbon into a chlamydia-controlled assimilation pathway.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23371946