Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Jean Marc Panaud
Cyanobactérie souche "PCC 9401". Souche de la "Pasteur Culture Collection of Cyanobacteria" conservée à l'état axénique dans l'Unité des Cyanobactéries. La PCC est l'une des Collections spécialisées de l'Institut Pasteur.
Publication : Nature chemical biology

Metabolic and evolutionary origin of actin-binding polyketides from diverse organisms

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Nature chemical biology - 03 Aug 2015

Ueoka R, Uria AR, Reiter S, Mori T, Karbaum P, Peters EE, Helfrich EJ, Morinaka BI, Gugger M, Takeyama H, Matsunaga S, Piel J

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 26236936

Nat. Chem. Biol. 2015 Sep;11(9):705-12

Actin-targeting macrolides comprise a large, structurally diverse group of cytotoxins isolated from remarkably dissimilar micro- and macroorganisms. In spite of their disparate origins and structures, many of these compounds bind actin at the same site and exhibit structural relationships reminiscent of modular, combinatorial drug libraries. Here we investigate biosynthesis and evolution of three compound groups: misakinolides, scytophycin-type compounds and luminaolides. For misakinolides from the sponge Theonella swinhoei WA, our data suggest production by an uncultivated ‘Entotheonella’ symbiont, further supporting the relevance of these bacteria as sources of bioactive polyketides and peptides in sponges. Insights into misakinolide biosynthesis permitted targeted genome mining for other members, providing a cyanobacterial luminaolide producer as the first cultivated source for this dimeric compound family. The data indicate that this polyketide family is bacteria-derived and that the unusual macrolide diversity is the result of combinatorial pathway modularity for some compounds and of convergent evolution for others.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26236936