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© Research
Publication : Oncogene research

Lymphoproliferative syndrome associated with c-myc expression driven by a class I gene promoter in transgenic mice

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Oncogene research - 01 Jan 1989

Morello D, Lavenu A, Bandeira A, Portnoi D, Gaillard J, Babinet C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 2654814

Oncogene Res. 1989;4(2):111-25

We have produced transgenic mice carrying an H-2K/human c-myc fusion gene. In this construct, the human c-myc proto-oncogene expression is driven by the 5′ flanking sequences (including promoter) of the class I H-2Kb gene, which have previously been shown to direct the expression of a marker gene, the human growth hormone (hGH), in most tissues of H-2K/hGH transgenic mice. Comparative analysis, by S1 nuclease mapping, of the H-2K and human c-myc gene expression in different organs of the H-2K/myc mice shows that exogenous c-myc and endogenous H-2K expression is found in most organs examined. However, the liver is a notable exception, for here c-myc expression is very weak. The exogenous c-myc expression is maximal in lymphoid organs of all H-2K/myc transgenic strains. One strain, H-2K/myc 27, hereditarily develops a lymphoproliferative syndrome which eventually leads to death. The H-2K/myc 27 lymphoid tissues are profoundly abnormal: pre-B cells as well as mature B cells are underrepresented in the bone marrow but the thymus as well as lymph nodes are largely infiltrated by B cells. Moreover, in the thymus, the proportions of the different thymic cell populations are altered. However, in the other H-2K/myc transgenic strains, even in those expressing a comparable or even higher level of myc, no pathology has been observed over a period of 20 months. Our results, therefore, demonstrate that constitutive enforced c-myc expression might disturb lymphocyte development, but does not directly lead to malignancy.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2654814