Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : DNA repair

Low joining efficiency and non-conservative repair of two distant double-strand breaks in mouse embryonic stem cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in DNA repair - 26 Oct 2007

Boubakour-Azzouz I, Ricchetti M

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 17964863

DNA Repair (Amst.) 2008 Feb;7(2):149-61

Efficient and faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for genome stability. To understand whether cells carrying a functional repair apparatus are able to efficiently heal two distant chromosome ends and whether this DNA lesion might result in genome rearrangements, we induced DSBs in genetically modified mouse embryonic stem cells carrying two I-SceI sites in cis separated by a distance of 9 kbp. We show that in this context non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) can repair using standard DNA pairing of the broken ends, but it also joins 3′ non-complementary overhangs that require unusual joining intermediates. The repair efficiency of this lesion appears to be dramatically low and the extent of genome alterations was high in striking contrast with the spectra of repair events reported for two collinear DSBs in other experimental systems. The dramatic decline in accuracy suggests that significant constraints operate in the repair process of these distant DSBs, which may also control the low efficiency of this process. These findings provide important insights into the mechanism of repair by NHEJ and how this process may protect the genome from large rearrangements.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17964863