Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Nicola Festuccia, Institut Pasteur
Mouse embryonic stem cells stained for Ki67 (red) and Esrrb (green)
Publication : Epigenetics & chromatin

Lineage-specific regulation of imprinted X inactivation in extraembryonic endoderm stem cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Epigenetics & chromatin - 20 Jun 2014

Merzouk S, Deuve JL, Dubois A, Navarro P, Avner P, Morey C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 25053977

Epigenetics Chromatin 2014;7:11

BACKGROUND: Silencing of the paternal X chromosome (Xp), a phenomenon known as imprinted X-chromosome inactivation (I-XCI), characterises, amongst mouse extraembryonic lineages, the primitive endoderm and the extraembryonic endoderm (XEN) stem cells derived from it.

RESULTS: Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation characterisation of histone modifications and single-cell expression studies, we show that whilst the Xp in XEN cells, like the inactive X chromosome in other cell types, globally accumulates the repressive histone mark H3K27me3, a large number of Xp genes locally lack H3K27me3 and escape from I-XCI. In most cases this escape is specific to the XEN cell lineage. Importantly, the degree of escape and the genes concerned remain unchanged upon XEN conversion into visceral endoderm, suggesting stringent control of I-XCI in XEN derivatives. Surprisingly, chemical inhibition of EZH2, a member of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and subsequent loss of H3K27me3 on the Xp, do not drastically perturb the pattern of silencing of Xp genes in XEN cells.

CONCLUSIONS: The observations that we report here suggest that the maintenance of gene expression profiles of the inactive Xp in XEN cells involves a tissue-specific mechanism that acts partly independently of PRC2 catalytic activity.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25053977