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© Research
Publication : Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

Life span of B lymphocytes: the experimental basis for conflicting results

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) - 01 Jan 1986

Freitas AA, Rocha B, Coutinho AA

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 3484494

J. Immunol. 1986 Jan;136(2):470-6

Recent claims have challenged the view that most peripheral, mature B cells are long-lived, and propose rates of peripheral decay that are compatible with bone marrow production. This disagreement can only reflect differences in the protocols and methods used to measure peripheral lymphocyte life spans. We have now assessed toxic or other nonselective effects of hydroxyurea treatment on the survival and migration of peripheral, noncycling cells, as well as possible reasons for exaggerated decays of LPS-reactive B cells transferred to LPS nonresponder hosts, the two methods leading to conclusions of short life spans. We also studied general effects on cell survival introduced by either repeated [3H]thymidine injections or the stress associated with surgery, thoracic duct cannulation in particular–methods with which the notion of long life spans had been established. The results failed to show toxic or nonselective effects of hydroxyurea treatments and artificial decays of LPS-reactive cells in adoptive hosts. In contrast, the present experiments demonstrate that both the stress associated with surgery and repeated [3H] thymidine administration profoundly deplete a pool of short-lived B cells, consequently selecting for an apparent higher proportion of long-lived cells.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3484494