Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Scientific reports

Influence of genetic polymorphism on transcriptional enhancer activity in the malaria vector Anopheles coluzzii

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Scientific reports - 24 Oct 2019

Nardini L, Holm I, Pain A, Bischoff E, Gohl DM, Zongo S, Guelbeogo WM, Sagnon N, Vernick KD, Riehle MM

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 31649293

Sci Rep 2019 Oct;9(1):15275

Enhancers are cis-regulatory elements that control most of the developmental and spatial gene expression in eukaryotes. Genetic variation of enhancer sequences is known to influence phenotypes, but the effect of enhancer variation upon enhancer functional activity and downstream phenotypes has barely been examined in any species. In the African malaria vector, Anopheles coluzzii, we identified candidate enhancers in the proximity of genes relevant for immunity, insecticide resistance, and development. The candidate enhancers were functionally validated using luciferase reporter assays, and their activity was found to be essentially independent of their physical orientation, a typical property of enhancers. All of the enhancers segregated genetically polymorphic alleles, which displayed significantly different levels of functional activity. Deletion mutagenesis and functional testing revealed a fine structure of positive and negative regulatory elements that modulate activity of the enhancer core. Enhancer polymorphisms segregate in wild A. coluzzii populations in West Africa. Thus, enhancer variants that modify target gene expression leading to likely phenotypic consequences are frequent in nature. These results demonstrate the existence of naturally polymorphic A. coluzzii enhancers, which may help explain important differences between individuals or populations for malaria transmission efficiency and vector adaptation to the environment.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31649293