Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Artur Scherf
Scanning Electron Microscopy of Red Blood Cell infected by Plasmodium falciparum.
Publication : Immunobiology

In vivo presentation of Mls-1 antigen by T and B lymphocytes

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Immunobiology - 01 Jun 1992

Dannecker G, Mecheri S, Hoffmann MK

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 1398739

Immunobiology 1992 Jun;185(1):20-7

Previous studies of minor lymphocyte stimulatory (Mls) presenting lymphoid cells had shown that B cells rather than T cells present stimulatory Mls-1 antigen in vitro whereas B as well as T cells present Mls-1 antigen in vivo. Deletion of Mls-1 reactive T cells in the thymus of newborn mice is induced by T cells rather than by B cells. Applying a recently developed method for measuring the Mls-1 response in Mls-1- mice we assessed the Mls-1 stimulatory activity of T and B cells quantitatively. B cells are significantly more effective than T cells in this process. Both Mls-1+ T and B cells are also capable of inducing Mls-1 anergy in Mls-1- mice. Remarkably few lymphoid cells from Mls-1+ animals are needed for this effect: a few thousand B cells or 10(4) to 10(5) T cells per mouse induce substantial Mls-1 anergy in Mls-1- mice. These low cellular requirements for Mls-1 anergy production correspond well to the low T cell requirements described for the induction of Mls-1 tolerance in newborn mice. However, the high efficacy of B cells in inducing peripheral Mls-1 anergy contrasts with their failure to induce neonatal tolerance in newborn animals. We attribute this discrepancy to the previous notion that stimulatory Mls-1 antigen is not delivered to the thymus and that B cells and T cells present qualitatively different Mls-1 related signals to Mls-1 reactive T cells.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1398739