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© Matteo Bonazzi, Edith Gouin
Observation en immunofluorescence d'une cellule infectée par Listeria monocytogenes. En bleu: marquage des protéines de surface de Listeria qui permet de visualiser les bactéries. En rouge et vert: marquage de l'actine, une protéine qui forme le cytosquelette des cellules. Les Listeria utilisent l'actine cellulaire pour former des "comêtes" et se déplacer à l'intérieur des cellules qu'elles infectent. Cell infected by Listeria monocytogenes. The surface proteins (in blue) of Listeria enable us to view the bacteria. Actin, a constituent protein of cells, is shown in red and green.
Publication : Signal Transduct Target Ther

Human IgG1 antibodies suppress angiogenesis in a target-independent manner

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Signal Transduct Target Ther - 28 Jan 2016

Bogdanovich S, Kim Y, Mizutani T, Yasuma R, Tudisco L, Cicatiello V, Bastos-Carvalho A, Kerur N, Hirano Y, Baffi JZ, Tarallo V, Li S, Yasuma T, Arpitha P, Fowler BJ, Wright CB, Apicella I, Greco A, Brunetti A, Ruvo M, Sandomenico A, Nozaki M, Ijima R, Kaneko H, Ogura Y, Terasaki H, Ambati BK, Leusen JH, Langdon WY, Clark MR, Armour KL, Bruhns P, Verbeek JS, Gelfand BD, De Falco S, Ambati J.

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 26918197

Signal Transduct Target Ther. 2016;1. pii: 15001. Epub 2016 Jan 28.

Angiogenesis: Untargeted effects of widely used drugs

Researchers have shown monoclonal antibodies, precision drugs used for many diseases, have unexpected, untargeted effects on blood vessels. These drugs are the most widely used therapy for conditions driven by aberrant angiogenesis – the abnormal growth of blood vessels – such as certain cancers and blinding disorders. A large international research team, led by Jayakrishna Ambati at the University of Kentucky, now reports a novel unexpected mechanism by which monoclonal antibodies can block blood vessel growth regardless of their molecular target. They showed that this generic anti-angiogenic effect involves signaling through a cell-surface receptor known as FcγRI. These findings raise concerns about possible unwanted “off-target” effects of antibody drugs, but also identify FcγRI as a possible target for new drugs to control angiogenesis,

http://www.nature.com/articles/sigtrans20151