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© Institut Pasteur/Antoinette Ryter
Salmonella spp. Bactéries à Gram négatif, aérobies ou anaérobies facultatifs à transmission orofécale. Les salmonelles majeures (sérotype typhi et sérotype paratyphi) sont responsables des fièvres typhoïde et paratyphoïde chez l'homme uniquement ; les salmonelles mineures (sérotype typhimurium et sérotype enteritidis) sont impliquées dans 30 à 60 % des gastroentérites et toxiinfections d'origine alimentaire. Image colorisée.
Publication : Journal of clinical microbiology

High-throughput genotyping of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi allowing geographical assignment of haplotypes and pathotypes within an urban District of Jakarta, Indonesia

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of clinical microbiology - 05 Mar 2008

Baker S, Holt K, van de Vosse E, Roumagnac P, Whitehead S, King E, Ewels P, Keniry A, Weill FX, Lightfoot D, van Dissel JT, Sanderson KE, Farrar J, Achtman M, Deloukas P, Dougan G

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 18322069

J. Clin. Microbiol. 2008 May;46(5):1741-6

High-throughput epidemiological typing systems that provide phylogenetic and genotypic information are beneficial for tracking bacterial pathogens in the field. The incidence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi infection in Indonesia is high and is associated with atypical phenotypic traits such as expression of the j and the z66 flagellum antigens. Utilizing a high-throughput genotyping platform to investigate known nucleotide polymorphisms dispersed around the genome, we determined the haplotypes of 140 serovar Typhi isolates associated with Indonesia. We identified nine distinct serovar Typhi haplotypes circulating in Indonesia for more than 30 years, with eight of these present in a single Jakarta suburb within a 2-year period. One dominant haplotype, H59, is associated with j and z66 flagellum expression, representing a potential pathotype unique to Indonesia. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that H59 z66(+), j(+) isolates emerged relatively recently in terms of the origin of serovar Typhi and are geographically restricted. These data demonstrate the potential of high-throughput genotyping platforms for analyzing serovar Typhi populations in the field. The study also provides insight into the evolution of serovar Typhi and demonstrates the value of a molecular epidemiological technique that is exchangeable, that is internet friendly, and that has global utility.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18322069