Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Molecular human reproduction

Haplotypes, mutations and male fertility: the story of the testis-specific ubiquitin protease USP26

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular human reproduction - 03 Aug 2006

Ravel C, El Houate B, Chantot S, Lourenço D, Dumaine A, Rouba H, Bandyopadahyay A, Radhakrishna U, Das B, Sengupta S, Mandelbaum J, Siffroi JP, McElreavey K

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 16888075

Mol. Hum. Reprod. 2006 Oct;12(10):643-6

Recently, mutations in the X-linked ubiquitin protease 26 (USP26) gene have been proposed to be associated with male infertility. In particular a 371insACA, 494T>C and 1423C>T haplotype, which results in a T123-124ins, L165S and H475Y amino acid change respectively, has been reported to be associated with Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS) and an absence of sperm in the ejaculate. Here, we demonstrate that two of these changes actually correspond to the ancestral sequence of the gene and that the USP26 haplotype is present in significant frequencies in sub-Saharan African and South and East Asian populations, including in individuals with known fertility. This indicates that the allele is not associated with infertility. The pattern of frequency distribution of the derived haplotype (371delACA, 494T), which is present at high frequencies in most non-African populations could be interpreted as either a result of migration followed by simple genetic drift or alternatively as positive selection acting on the derived alleles. The latter hypothesis seems likely, because there is evidence of strong positive selection acting on the USP26 gene.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16888075