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© Institut Pasteur
Cells infected for 24 hrs with C. Trachomatis. The cell nuclei are labelled in blue, the bacteria appear yellow, within the inclusion lumen. A bacterial protein secreted out the inclusion into the host cytoplasm id labelled in red.
Publication : Molecular microbiology

GarA is an essential regulator of metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular microbiology - 08 Sep 2013

Ventura M, Rieck B, Boldrin F, Degiacomi G, Bellinzoni M, Barilone N, Alzaidi F, Alzari PM, Manganelli R, O'Hare HM

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23962235

Mol. Microbiol. 2013 Oct;90(2):356-66

Alpha-ketoglutarate is a key metabolic intermediate at the crossroads of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, whose fate is tightly regulated. In mycobacteria the protein GarA regulates the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glutamate synthesis by direct binding and regulation of three enzymes that use α-ketoglutarate. GarA, in turn, is thought to be regulated via phosphorylation by protein kinase G and other kinases. We have investigated the requirement for GarA for metabolic regulation during growth in vitro and in macrophages. GarA was found to be essential to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but dispensable in non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis. Disruption of garA caused a distinctive, nutrient-dependent phenotype, fitting with its proposed role in regulating glutamate metabolism. The data underline the importance of the TCA cycle and the balance with glutamate synthesis in M. tuberculosis and reveal vulnerability to disruption of these pathways.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23962235