Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Medecine et maladies infectieuses

From phaeohyphomycosis to disseminated chromoblastomycosis: A retrospective study of infections caused by dematiaceous fungi

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Medecine et maladies infectieuses - 12 Apr 2018

Thomas E, Bertolotti A, Barreau A, Klisnick J, Tournebize P, Borgherini G, Zemali N, Jaubert J, Jouvion G, Bretagne S, Picot S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 29656841

Med Mal Infect 2018 Jun;48(4):278-285

OBJECTIVE: Infections caused by dematiaceous fungi are more common in tropical and subtropical areas. We aimed to describe the clinical, microbiological and therapeutic aspects of case patients diagnosed at a University Hospital located on an Indian Ocean island.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed an observational retrospective study of infections caused by dematiaceous fungi diagnosed at the University Hospital of Saint-Pierre, Reunion, from 2000 to 2015. Mycological identifications were performed at the National Reference Center for Invasive Mycosis and Antifungal Agents (Paris).

RESULTS: The review of clinical and microbiological data of 11 patients identified revealed that five were infected by dematiaceous fungi. Two had cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis, two had cerebral phaeohyphomycosis and one had cutaneous chromoblastomycosis with brain and potentially medullary dissemination. Skin lesions and cerebral abscesses were quite varied.

CONCLUSION: Infections caused by dematiaceous fungi are rare. Medullary and brain localizations are extremely rare, especially for chromoblastomycosis. Cutaneous manifestations of phaeohyphomycosis are varied; diagnosis is thus more difficult. It is therefore important, when confronted with a chronic tumor-like lesion in endemic areas, to perform a biopsy for pathology and fungal culture. While surgical excision is not always sufficient, medical treatment of these infections is not standardized, but relies on an azole, which can be associated with another antifungal agent.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29656841