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© Research
Publication : Urologia internationalis

First study of microdeletions in the Y chromosome of Algerian infertile men with idiopathic oligo- or azoospermia

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Urologia internationalis - 16 Mar 2013

Chellat D, Rezgoune ML, McElreavey K, Kherouatou N, Benbouhadja S, Douadi H, Cherifa B, Abadi N, Satta D

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23548818

Urol. Int. 2013;90(4):455-9

The human Y chromosome is essential for human sex determination and spermatogenesis. The long arm contains the azoospermia factor (AZF) region. Microdeletions in this region are responsible for male infertility. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of Y microdeletions in Algerian infertile males with azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia syndrome (OATS) and to compare the prevalence of these abnormalities with other countries and regions worldwide. A sample of 80 Algerian infertile males with a low sperm count (1-20 × 10(6) sperms/ml) as well as 20 fertile male controls was screened for Y chromosome microdeletions. 49 men were azoospermic and 31 men had OATS. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood and polymerase chain reaction was carried out with a set of 6 AZFa, AZFb and AZFc STS markers to detect the microdeletions as recommended by the European Academy of Andrology. Among the 80 infertile men screened for microdeletion, 1 subject was found to have microdeletions in the AZFc (sY254 and sY255) region. The deletion was found in azoospermic subjects (1/49, 2%). The overall AZF deletion frequency was low (1/80, 1.3%). AZF microdeletions were observed neither in the OATS group nor in the control group. The frequency of AZF microdeletions in infertile men from Algeria was comparable to those reported in the literature. We suggest analyzing 6 STS in the first step to detect Y microdeletions in our population.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23548818