Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Frontiers in oncology

Expression of Bioactive Chemerin by Keratinocytes Inhibits Late Stages of Tumor Development in a Chemical Model of Skin Carcinogenesis

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Frontiers in oncology - 15 Nov 2019

Dubois-Vedrenne I, De Henau O, Robert V, Langa F, Al Delbany D, Vosters O, Angelats-Canals E, Vernimmen M, Luangsay S, Wittamer V, Parmentier M

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 31803622

Front Oncol 2019;9:1253

Chemerin is a multifunctional protein acting mainly through the G protein-coupled receptor ChemR23/CMKLR1/Chemerin. Its expression is frequently downregulated in human tumors, including in melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin and anti-tumoral properties of chemerin were reported in mouse tumor graft models. In the present study, we report the development of spontaneous skin tumors in aged ChemR23-deficient mice. In order to test the potential therapeutic benefit of chemerin analogs, a transgenic model in which bioactive chemerin is over-expressed by basal keratinocytes was generated. These animals are characterized by increased levels of chemerin immunoreactivity and bioactivity in the skin and the circulation. In a chemical carcinogenesis model, papillomas developed later, were less numerous, and their progression to carcinomas was delayed. Temporal control of chemerin expression by doxycycline allowed to attribute its effects to late stages of carcinogenesis. The protective effects of chemerin were partly abrogated by ChemR23 invalidation. These results demonstrate that chemerin is able to delay very significantly tumor progression in a model that recapitulates closely the evolution of solid cancer types in human and suggest that the chemerin-ChemR23 system might constitute an interesting target for therapeutic intervention in the cancer field.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31803622