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© Artur Scherf
Scanning Electron Microscopy of Red Blood Cell infected by Plasmodium falciparum.
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Expansion, in vivo-ex vivo cycling, and genetic manipulation of primary human hepatocytes

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 08 Jan 2020

Michailidis E, Vercauteren K, Mancio-Silva L, Andrus L, Jahan C, Ricardo-Lax I, Zou C, Kabbani M, Park P, Quirk C, Pyrgaki C, Razooky B, Verhoye L, Zoluthkin I, Lu WY, Forbes SJ, Chiriboga L, Theise ND, Herzog RW, Suemizu H, Schneider WM, Shlomai A, Meuleman P, Bhatia SN, Rice CM, de Jong YP

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 31915293

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2020 Jan;

Primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) are an essential tool for modeling drug metabolism and liver disease. However, variable plating efficiencies, short lifespan in culture, and resistance to genetic manipulation have limited their use. Here, we show that the pyrrolizidine alkaloid retrorsine improves PHH repopulation of chimeric mice on average 10-fold and rescues the ability of even poorly plateable donor hepatocytes to provide cells for subsequent ex vivo cultures. These mouse-passaged (mp) PHH cultures overcome the marked donor-to-donor variability of cryopreserved PHH and remain functional for months as demonstrated by metabolic assays and infection with hepatitis B virus and mpPHH can be efficiently genetically modified in culture, mobilized, and then recultured as spheroids or retransplanted to create highly humanized mice that carry a genetically altered hepatocyte graft. Together, these advances provide flexible tools for the study of human liver disease and evaluation of hepatocyte-targeted gene therapy approaches.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31915293