Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Médecine sciences : M/S

[Expanding the known diversity and environmental distribution of cultured and uncultured bacteria]

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Médecine sciences : M/S - 01 Mar 2005

Dauga C, Doré J, Sghir A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15745704

Med Sci (Paris) 2005 Mar;21(3):290-6

Microorganisms represent the largest component of biodiversity in our biosphere. Traditional methods of bacterial identification depend on their culture on laboratory media and the comparison of their phenotypic characteristics. They include cellular morphology, motility, staining reactions of cell walls, ability to grow on different media and biochemical tests. These methods have many limitations and only a very small fraction of microorganisms have been cultivated. To date, molecular methods based on 16S rRNA sequences and their phylogenetic analysis are widely used for reliable identification, particularly for hard-to-culture microbial pathogens. These so-called do not require laboratory culture of isolated organisms, and many novel non-described phyla have been detected, improving our view of bacterial diversity. Novel strategies for culturing the are now under development, which are leading to the complete characterization of these new bacteria. More recently, meta- or ecogenomics, based on the complete sequencing of clones containing cosmids or bacterial artificial chromosomes with inserts, addresses the genetic potential of a sample irrespective of whether the microorganisms can be cultured or not. This has considerably extended our view of microbial diversity at the genomic level and the probability of finding new genes and their products suitable for the biotechnological and pharmaceutical industry.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15745704