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© Sandrine Etienne-Manneville
Photo prise à l'avant (dans la protrusion) d'astrocytes primaires de rat en migration. Marquage par immunofluorescence montrant en rouge, p150 Glued, une protéine associée aux extrémités 'plus' des microtubules et en vert la tubuline des microtubules. La photographie montre l'accumulation de p150 Glued à l'avant des cellules en migration, où la protéine pourrait participer à l'ancrage des microtubules à la membrane plasmique. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaires.
Publication : Biochemical and biophysical research communications

ExoY from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a nucleotidyl cyclase with preference for cGMP and cUMP formation

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Biochemical and biophysical research communications - 24 Jun 2014

Beckert U, Wolter S, Hartwig C, Bähre H, Kaever V, Ladant D, Frank DW, Seifert R

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24971548

Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 2014 Jul;450(1):870-4

In addition to the well known second messengers cAMP and cGMP, mammalian cells contain the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotides cCMP and cUMP. Soluble guanylyl cyclase and soluble adenylyl cyclase produce all four cNMPs. Several bacterial toxins exploit mammalian cyclic nucleotide signaling. The type III secretion protein ExoY from Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces severe lung damage and effectively produces cGMP. Here, we show that transfection of mammalian cells with ExoY or infection with ExoY-expressing P. aeruginosa not only massively increases cGMP but also cUMP levels. In contrast, the structurally related CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis exhibit a striking preference for cAMP increases. Thus, ExoY is a nucleotidyl cyclase with preference for cGMP and cUMP production. The differential effects of bacterial toxins on cNMP levels suggest that cUMP plays a distinct second messenger role.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24971548