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© Institut Pasteur
Cryptococcus neoformans
Publication : PloS one

Evidence for reductive genome evolution and lateral acquisition of virulence functions in two Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strains

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in PloS one - 18 Apr 2011

Ruiz JC, D'Afonseca V, Silva A, Ali A, Pinto AC, Santos AR, Rocha AA, Lopes DO, Dorella FA, Pacheco LG, Costa MP, Turk MZ, Seyffert N, Moraes PM, Soares SC, Almeida SS, Castro TL, Abreu VA, Trost E, Baumbach J, Tauch A, Schneider MP, McCulloch J, Cerdeira LT, Ramos RT, Zerlotini A, Dominitini A, Resende DM, Coser EM, Oliveira LM, Pedrosa AL, Vieira CU, Guimarães CT, Bartholomeu DC, Oliveira DM, Santos FR, Rabelo ÉM, Lobo FP, Franco GR, Costa AF, Castro IM, Dias SR, Ferro JA, Ortega JM, Paiva LV, Goulart LR, Almeida JF, Ferro MI, Carneiro NP, Falcão PR, Grynberg P, Teixeira SM, Brommonschenkel S, Oliveira SC, Meyer R, Moore RJ, Miyoshi A, Oliveira GC, Azevedo V

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21533164

PLoS ONE 2011 Apr;6(4):e18551

BACKGROUND: Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, a gram-positive, facultative intracellular pathogen, is the etiologic agent of the disease known as caseous lymphadenitis (CL). CL mainly affects small ruminants, such as goats and sheep; it also causes infections in humans, though rarely. This species is distributed worldwide, but it has the most serious economic impact in Oceania, Africa and South America. Although C. pseudotuberculosis causes major health and productivity problems for livestock, little is known about the molecular basis of its pathogenicity.

METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We characterized two C. pseudotuberculosis genomes (Cp1002, isolated from goats; and CpC231, isolated from sheep). Analysis of the predicted genomes showed high similarity in genomic architecture, gene content and genetic order. When C. pseudotuberculosis was compared with other Corynebacterium species, it became evident that this pathogenic species has lost numerous genes, resulting in one of the smallest genomes in the genus. Other differences that could be part of the adaptation to pathogenicity include a lower GC content, of about 52%, and a reduced gene repertoire. The C. pseudotuberculosis genome also includes seven putative pathogenicity islands, which contain several classical virulence factors, including genes for fimbrial subunits, adhesion factors, iron uptake and secreted toxins. Additionally, all of the virulence factors in the islands have characteristics that indicate horizontal transfer.

CONCLUSIONS: These particular genome characteristics of C. pseudotuberculosis, as well as its acquired virulence factors in pathogenicity islands, provide evidence of its lifestyle and of the pathogenicity pathways used by this pathogen in the infection process. All genomes cited in this study are available in the NCBI Genbank database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/) under accession numbers CP001809 and CP001829.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21533164