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© Research
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Efficient transduction of neural cells in vitro and in vivo by a baculovirus-derived vector

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 19 Dec 2000

Sarkis C, Serguera C, Petres S, Buchet D, Ridet JL, Edelman L, Mallet J

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 11114190

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2000 Dec;97(26):14638-43

Gene delivery to the central nervous system is central to the development of gene therapy for neurological diseases. We developed a baculovirus-derived vector, the Bac-CMV-GFP vector, containing a reporter gene encoding for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. Two neuroblastomal cell lines and three human primary neural cultures could be efficiently transduced. In all cases, addition of butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, increased the level of expression in terms of the number of GFP-expressing cells and the intensity of fluorescence. The level of expression in a human telencephalic culture was over 50% of transduced cells with a multiplicity of infection of 25. GFP expression was demonstrated to be genuine expression and not pseudotransduction of the reporter protein. Most interestingly, Bac-CMV-GFP could transduce neural cells in vivo when directly injected into the brain of rodents and was not inactivated by the complement system. Thus, baculovirus is a promising tool for gene transfer into the central nervous system both for studies of the function of foreign genes and the development of gene therapy strategies.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11114190