Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene

Effect of infection by Plasmodium falciparum on the melanization immune response of Anopheles gambiae

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene - 01 Mar 2007

Lambrechts L, Morlais I, Awono-Ambene PH, Cohuet A, Simard F, Jacques JC, Bourgouin C, Koella JC

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 17360870

Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 2007 Mar;76(3):475-80

Melanization is an immune response of mosquitoes that could potentially limit Plasmodium development. That mosquitoes rarely melanize Plasmodium falciparum in natural populations might result from immuno-suppression by the parasite, as has been observed in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected by Plasmodium gallinaceum. We tested this possibility in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes infected by P. falciparum by comparing the ability to melanize a Sephadex bead of infected mosquitoes, of mosquitoes that had fed on infectious blood without becoming infected, and of control mosquitoes fed on uninfected blood. Rather than being immuno-suppressed, infected mosquitoes tended to have a stronger melanization response than mosquitoes in which the infection failed and than control mosquitoes, possibly because of immune activation after previous exposure to invading parasites. This finding suggests that P. falciparum relies on immune evasion rather than immuno-suppression to avoid being melanized and confirms that natural malaria transmission systems differ from laboratory models of mosquito-Plasmodium interactions.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17360870