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© Pierre Gounon
Virus influenza purifié, agent de la grippe. Ce virus enveloppé possède un génome fragmenté : 8 segments d'ARN négatif protégés par une nucléocapside.
Publication : PloS one

Early MinION™ nanopore single-molecule sequencing technology enables the characterization of hepatitis B virus genetic complexity in clinical samples

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in PloS one - 22 Mar 2018

Sauvage V, Boizeau L, Candotti D, Vandenbogaert M, Servant-Delmas A, Caro V, Laperche S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 29566006

PLoS ONE 2018;13(3):e0194366

Until recently, the method of choice to characterize viral diversity consisted in cloning PCR amplicons of full-length viral genomes and Sanger-sequencing of multiple clones. However, this is extremely laborious, time-consuming, and low-throughput. Next generation short-read sequencing appears also limited by its inability to directly sequence full-length viral genomes. The MinION™ device recently developed by Oxford Nanopore Technologies can be a promising alternative by applying long-read single-molecule sequencing directly to the overall amplified products generated in a PCR reaction. This new technology was evaluated by using hepatitis B virus (HBV) as a model. Several previously characterized HBV-infected clinical samples were investigated including recombinant virus, variants that harbored deletions and mixed population. Original MinION device was able to generate individual complete 3,200-nt HBV genome sequences and to identify recombinant variants. MinION was particularly efficient in detecting HBV genomes with multiple large in-frame deletions and spliced variants concomitantly with non-deleted parental genomes. However, an average-12% sequencing error rate per individual reads associated to a low throughput challenged single-nucleotide resolution, polymorphism calling and phasing mutations directly from the sequencing reads. Despite this high error rate, the pairwise identity of MinION HBV consensus genome was consistent with Sanger sequencing method. MinION being under continuous development, further studies are needed to evaluate its potential use for viral infection characterization.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29566006