Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Valérie Choumet
Mosquitoes were orally infected with the chikungunya virus. Midguts were dissected at day 5 post-infection, fixed and permeabilised. Virus is shown in red (anti-E2 protein, cyanine 3), the actin network in green (phalloidin 548) and nuclei in blue (DAPI).
Publication : The Journal of biological chemistry

Divergent evolution in metabotropic glutamate receptors. A new receptor activated by an endogenous ligand different from glutamate in insects

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of biological chemistry - 01 Dec 2003

Mitri C, Parmentier ML, Pin JP, Bockaert J, Grau Y

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 14660580

J. Biol. Chem. 2004 Mar;279(10):9313-20

The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors involved in the regulation of glutamatergic synapses. Surprisingly, the evolution-arily distant Drosophila mGluR shares a very similar pharmacological profile with its mammalian orthologues (mGlu2R and mGlu3R). Such a conservation in ligand recognition indicates a strong selective pressure during evolution to maintain the ligand recognition selectivity of mGluRs and suggests that structural constraints within the ligand binding pocket (LBP) would hinder divergent evolution. Here we report the identification of a new receptor homologous to mGluRs found in Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, and Drosophila melanogaster genomes and called AmXR, HBmXR, and DmXR, respectively (the mXRs group). Sequence comparison associated with three-dimensional modeling of the LBP revealed that the residues contacting the amino acid moiety of glutamate (the alpha-COO(-) and NH(3)(+) groups) were conserved in mXRs, whereas the residues interacting with the gamma-carboxylic group were not. This suggested that the mXRs evolved to recognize an amino acid different from glutamate. The Drosophila cDNA encoding DmXR was isolated and found to be insensitive to glutamate or any other standard amino acid. However, a chimeric receptor with the heptahelical and intracellular domains of DmXR coupled to G-protein. We found that the DmX receptor was activated by a ligand containing an amino group, which was extracted from Drosophila head and from other insects (Anopheles and Schistocerca). No orthologue of mXR could be detected in Caenorhabditis elegans or human genomes. These data indicate that the LBP of the mGluRs has diverged in insects to recognize a new ligand.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14660580