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© Research
Publication : Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

Cutting edge: crucial role of IL-1 and IL-23 in the innate IL-17 response of peripheral lymph node NK1.1- invariant NKT cells to bacteria

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) - 17 Dec 2010

Doisne JM, Soulard V, Bécourt C, Amniai L, Henrot P, Havenar-Daughton C, Blanchet C, Zitvogel L, Ryffel B, Cavaillon JM, Marie JC, Couillin I, Benlagha K

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 21169541

J. Immunol. 2011 Jan;186(2):662-6

We have shown previously that peripheral lymph node-resident retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt(+) NK1.1(-) invariant NKT (iNKT) cells produce IL-17A independently of IL-6. In this study, we show that the concomitant presence of IL-1 and IL-23 is crucial to induce a rapid and sustained IL-17A/F and IL-22 response by these cells that requires TCR-CD1d interaction and partly relies on IL-23-mediated upregulation of IL-23R and IL-1R1 expression. We further show that IL-1 and IL-23 produced by pathogen-associated molecular pattern-stimulated dendritic cells induce this response from NK1.1(-) iNKT cells in vitro, involving mainly TLR2/4-signaling pathways. Finally, we found that IL-17A production by these cells occurs very early and transiently in vivo in response to heat-killed bacteria. Overall, our study indicates that peripheral lymph node NK1.1(-) iNKT cells could be a source of innate Th17-related cytokines during bacterial infections and supports the hypothesis that they are able to provide an efficient first line of defense against bacterial invasion.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21169541