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© Biologie structurale et chimie
Structure du domaine en doigt de zinc de la protéine NEMO, déterminée par Résonance magnétique nucléaire (RMN). Cette protéine jouant un rôle dans des maladies (cancer, inflammation), les connaissances acquises sur sa structure offrent de précieuses informations sur sa fonction.
Publication : Nature communications

CSF-contacting neurons regulate locomotion by relaying mechanical stimuli to spinal circuits

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Nature communications - 07 Mar 2016

Böhm UL, Prendergast A, Djenoune L, Nunes Figueiredo S, Gomez J, Stokes C, Kaiser S, Suster M, Kawakami K, Charpentier M, Concordet JP, Rio JP, Del Bene F, Wyart C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 26946992

Nat Commun 2016 Mar;7:10866

Throughout vertebrates, cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs) are ciliated cells surrounding the central canal in the ventral spinal cord. Their contribution to modulate locomotion remains undetermined. Recently, we have shown CSF-cNs modulate locomotion by directly projecting onto the locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs), but the sensory modality these cells convey to spinal circuits and their relevance to innate locomotion remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate in vivo that CSF-cNs form an intraspinal mechanosensory organ that detects spinal bending. By performing calcium imaging in moving animals, we show that CSF-cNs respond to both passive and active bending of the spinal cord. In mutants for the channel Pkd2l1, CSF-cNs lose their response to bending and animals show a selective reduction of tail beat frequency, confirming the central role of this feedback loop for optimizing locomotion. Altogether, our study reveals that CSF-cNs constitute a mechanosensory organ operating during locomotion to modulate spinal CPGs.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26946992