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© Institut Pasteur
Macrophages et lymphocytes de souris. Image colorisée.
Publication : Frontiers in cell and developmental biology

Crosstalk Between the Hepatic and Hematopoietic Systems During Embryonic Development.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Frontiers in cell and developmental biology - 01 Jan 2020

Soares-da-Silva F, Peixoto M, Cumano A, Pinto-do-Ó P,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 32793589

Link to DOI [DOI] – 10.3389/fcell.2020.00612

Front Cell Dev Biol 2020 ; 8(): 612

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generated during embryonic development are able to maintain hematopoiesis for the lifetime, producing all mature blood lineages. HSC transplantation is a widely used cell therapy intervention in the treatment of hematologic, autoimmune and genetic disorders. Its use, however, is hampered by the inability to expand HSCs ex vivo, urging for a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating their physiological expansion. In the adult, HSCs reside in the bone marrow, in specific microenvironments that support stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Conversely, while developing, HSCs are transiently present in the fetal liver, the major hematopoietic site in the embryo, where they expand. Deeper insights on the dynamics of fetal liver composition along development, and on how these different cell types impact hematopoiesis, are needed. Both, the hematopoietic and hepatic fetal systems have been extensively studied, albeit independently. This review aims to explore their concurrent establishment and evaluate to what degree they may cross modulate their respective development. As insights on the molecular networks that govern physiological HSC expansion accumulate, it is foreseeable that strategies to enhance HSC proliferation will be improved.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32793589