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© Thierry Blisnick & Philippe Bastin, Institut Pasteur
Bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei cell
Publication : Journal of cell science

Conserved and specific functions of axoneme components in trypanosome motility

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of cell science - 01 Aug 2006

Branche C, Kohl L, Toutirais G, Buisson J, Cosson J, Bastin P

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 16882690

J. Cell. Sci. 2006 Aug;119(Pt 16):3443-55

The Trypanosoma brucei flagellum is unusual as it is attached along the cell body and contains, in addition to an apparently conventional axoneme, a structure called the paraflagellar rod, which is essential for cell motility. Here, we investigated flagellum behaviour in normal and mutant trypanosome cell lines where expression of genes encoding various axoneme proteins (PF16, PF20, DNAI1, LC2) had been silenced by RNAi. First, we show that the propulsive wave (normally used for forward motility) is abolished in the absence of outer dynein arms, whereas the reverse wave (normally used for changing direction) still occurs. Second, in contrast to Chlamydomonas–but like metazoa, the central pair adopts a fixed orientation during flagellum beating. This orientation becomes highly variable in central-pair- and outer-dynein-arm-mutants. Third, the paraflagellar rod contributes to motility by facilitating three-dimensional wave propagation and controlling cell shape. Fourth, motility is required to complete the last stage of cell division in both insect and bloodstream stages of the parasite. Finally, our study also reveals the conservation of molecular components of the trypanosome flagellum. Coupled to the ease of reverse genetics, it raises the interest of trypanosomes as model organisms to study cilia and flagella.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16882690