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© Research
Publication : Veterinary immunology and immunopathology

Canine cerebral leishmaniasis: potential role of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in the development of neurological disease

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Veterinary immunology and immunopathology - 11 May 2012

Melo GD, Marcondes M, Machado GF

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 22673195

Vet. Immunol. Immunopathol. 2012 Aug;148(3-4):260-6

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a group of calcium- and zinc-dependent endopeptidases that are involved in maintaining the extracellular matrix. MMP-2 and MMP-9 are thought to be related to the disruption of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) by their ability to cleave type IV collagen, the main component of the basal membrane. To establish the presence of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the pathogenesis of canine cerebral leishmaniasis, we examined the levels of these metalloproteinases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis and neurological symptoms (n=16) and in the CSF and serum of uninfected healthy dogs (n=10) using zymography. In the CSF of dogs with cerebral leishmaniasis there was a massive presence of active MMP-2, whereas only the levels of both proMMP-2 and proMMP-9 were elevated in the serum. Although the detected MMP activity in the CSF might merely be related to CNS inflammation, these enzymes may also play a collaborative role in the disease progression. Both MMP-2 and MMP-9 are known to target critical constituents of the BBB, and once activated, they may promote cerebral barrier breakdown, allowing the entrance of inflammatory cells and proteins within the nervous system milieu.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22673195