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© Artur Scherf
Scanning Electron Microscopy of Red Blood Cell infected by Plasmodium falciparum.
Publication : The Biochemical journal

Brefeldin A inhibits transport of the glycophorin-binding protein from Plasmodium falciparum into the host erythrocyte

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Biochemical journal - 15 Jun 1994

Benting J, Mattei D, Lingelbach K

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 8010965

Biochem. J. 1994 Jun;300 ( Pt 3):821-6

Plasmodium falciparum, a protozoan parasite of the human erythrocyte, causes the most severe form of malaria. During its intraerythrocytic development, the parasite synthesizes proteins which are exported into the host cell. The compartments involved in the secretory pathway of P. falciparum are still poorly characterized. A Golgi apparatus has not been identified, owing to the lack of specific protein markers and Golgi-specific post-translational modifications in the parasite. The fungal metabolite brefeldin A (BFA) is known to inhibit protein secretion in higher eukaryotes by disrupting the integrity of the Golgi apparatus. We have used the parasite-encoded glycophorin-binding protein (GBP), a soluble protein found in the host cell cytoplasm, as a marker to investigate the effects of BFA on protein secretion in the intracellular parasite. In the presence of BFA, GBP was not transported into the erythrocyte, but remained inside the parasite cell. The effect caused by BFA was reversible, and the protein could be chased into the host cell cytoplasm within 30 min. Transport of GBP from the BFA-sensitive site into the host cell did not require protein synthesis. Similar observations were made when infected erythrocytes were incubated at 15 degrees C. Incubation at 20 degrees C resulted in a reduction rather than a complete block of protein export. The relevance of our findings to the identification of compartments involved in protein secretion from the parasite cell is discussed.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8010965