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© Sandrine Etienne-Manneville
Photo prise à l'avant (dans la protrusion) d'astrocytes primaires de rat en migration. Marquage par immunofluorescence montrant en rouge, p150 Glued, une protéine associée aux extrémités 'plus' des microtubules et en vert la tubuline des microtubules. La photographie montre l'accumulation de p150 Glued à l'avant des cellules en migration, où la protéine pourrait participer à l'ancrage des microtubules à la membrane plasmique. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaires.
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin translocation across a tethered lipid bilayer

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 02 Dec 2013

Veneziano R, Rossi C, Chenal A, Devoisselle JM, Ladant D, Chopineau J

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24297899

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2013 Dec;110(51):20473-8

Numerous bacterial toxins can cross biological membranes to reach the cytosol of mammalian cells, where they exert their cytotoxic effects. Our model toxin, the adenylate cyclase (CyaA) from Bordetella pertussis, is able to invade eukaryotic cells by translocating its catalytic domain directly across the plasma membrane of target cells. To characterize its original translocation process, we designed an in vitro assay based on a biomimetic membrane model in which a tethered lipid bilayer (tBLM) is assembled on an amine-gold surface derivatized with calmodulin (CaM). The assembled bilayer forms a continuous and protein-impermeable boundary completely separating the underlying calmodulin (trans side) from the medium above (cis side). The binding of CyaA to the tBLM is monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. CyaA binding to the immobilized CaM, revealed by enzymatic activity, serves as a highly sensitive reporter of toxin translocation across the bilayer. Translocation of the CyaA catalytic domain was found to be strictly dependent on the presence of calcium and also on the application of a negative potential, as shown earlier in eukaryotic cells. Thus, CyaA is able to deliver its catalytic domain across a biological membrane without the need for any eukaryotic components besides CaM. This suggests that the calcium-dependent CyaA translocation may be driven in part by the electrical field across the membrane. This study’s in vitro demonstration of toxin translocation across a tBLM provides an opportunity to explore the molecular mechanisms of protein translocation across biological membranes in precisely defined experimental conditions.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24297899