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© Sandrine Etienne-Manneville
Photo prise à l'avant (dans la protrusion) d'astrocytes primaires de rat en migration. Marquage par immunofluorescence montrant en rouge, p150 Glued, une protéine associée aux extrémités 'plus' des microtubules et en vert la tubuline des microtubules. La photographie montre l'accumulation de p150 Glued à l'avant des cellules en migration, où la protéine pourrait participer à l'ancrage des microtubules à la membrane plasmique. Pour essayer de corriger, les dérèglements observés lors de la migration des cellules d'astrocytes tumuraux ou gliomes on cherche à connaitre les mécanismes moléculaires fondamentaux qui controlent la polarisation et la migration cellulaires.
Publication : Biochemistry

Behavior of the N-terminal helices of the diphtheria toxin T domain during the successive steps of membrane interaction

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Biochemistry - 24 Jan 2007

Montagner C, Perier A, Pichard S, Vernier G, Ménez A, Gillet D, Forge V, Chenal A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 17249698

Biochemistry 2007 Feb;46(7):1878-87

During intoxication of a cell, the translocation (T) domain of the diphtheria toxin helps the passage of the catalytic domain across the membrane of the endosome into the cytoplasm. We have investigated the behavior of the N-terminal region of the T domain during the successive steps of its interaction with membranes at acidic pH using tryptophan fluorescence, its quenching by brominated lipids, and trypsin digestion. The change in the environment of this region was monitored using mutant W281F carrying a single native tryptophan at position 206 at the tip of helix TH1. The intrinsic propensity to interact with the membrane of each helix of the N-terminus of the T domain, TH1, TH2, TH3, and TH4, was also studied using synthetic peptides. We showed the N-terminal region of the T domain was not involved in the binding of the domain to the membrane, which occurred at pH 6 mainly through hydrophobic effects. At that stage of the interaction, the N-terminal region remained strongly solvated. Further acidification eliminated repulsive electrostatic interactions between this region and the membrane, allowing its penetration into the membrane by attractive electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic effects. The peptide study indicated the nature of forces contributing to membrane penetration. Overall, the data suggested that the acidic pH found in the endosome not only triggers the formation of the molten globule state of the T domain required for membrane interaction but also governs a progressive penetration of the N-terminal part of the T domain in the membrane. We propose that these physicochemical properties are necessary for the translocation of the catalytic domain.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17249698