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© Melanie Blokesch, EPFL
Flagellated Vibrio cholerae
Publication : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

BapE DNA endonuclease induces an apoptotic-like response to DNA damage in Caulobacter.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America - 30 Oct 2012

Bos J, Yakhnina AA, Gitai Z,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23074244

Link to DOI – 10.1073/pnas.1213332109

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2012 Oct; 109(44): 18096-101

In the presence of extensive DNA damage, eukaryotes activate endonucleases to fragment their chromosomes and induce apoptotic cell death. Apoptotic-like responses have recently been described in bacteria, but primarily in specialized mutant backgrounds, and the factors responsible for DNA damage-induced chromosome fragmentation and death have not been identified. Here we find that wild-type Caulobacter cells induce apoptotic-like cell death in response to extensive DNA damage. The bacterial apoptosis endonuclease (BapE) protein is induced by damage but not involved in DNA repair itself, and mediates this cell fate decision. BapE fragments chromosomes by cleaving supercoiled DNA in a sequence-nonspecific manner, thereby perturbing chromosome integrity both in vivo and in vitro. This damage-induced chromosome fragmentation pathway resembles that of eukaryotic apoptosis. We propose that damage-induced programmed cell death can be a primary stress response for some bacterial species, providing isogenic bacterial communities with advantages similar to those that apoptosis provides to multicellular organisms.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23074244