Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy

Antibiotics in primary care in England: which antibiotics are prescribed and for which conditions?

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy - 01 Feb 2018

Dolk FCK, Pouwels KB, Smith DRM, Robotham JV, Smieszek T

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 29490062

J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 2018 Feb;73(suppl_2):ii2-ii10

Objectives: To analyse antibiotic prescribing behaviour in English primary care with particular regard to which antibiotics are prescribed and for which conditions.

Methods: Primary care data from 2013-15 recorded in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database were analysed. Records with a prescription for systemic antibiotics were extracted and linked to co-occurring diagnostic codes, which were used to attribute prescriptions to clinical conditions. We further assessed which antibiotic classes were prescribed and which conditions resulted in the greatest share of prescribing.

Results: The prescribing rate varied considerably among participating practices, with a median of 626 prescriptions/1000 patients (IQR 543-699). In total, 69% of antibiotic prescriptions (n = 3 156 507) could be linked to a body system and/or clinical condition. Of these prescriptions, 46% were linked to conditions of the respiratory tract, including ear, nose and throat (RT/ENT); leading conditions within this group were cough symptoms (22.7%), lower respiratory tract infection (RTI) (17.9%), sore throat (16.7%) and upper RTI (14.5%). After RT/ENT infections, infections of the urogenital tract (22.7% of prescriptions linked to a condition) and skin/wounds (16.4%) accounted for the greatest share of prescribing. Penicillins accounted for 50% of all prescriptions, followed by macrolides (13%), tetracyclines (12%) and trimethoprim (11%).

Conclusions: The majority of antibiotic prescriptions in English primary care were for infections of the respiratory and urinary tracts. However, in almost one-third of all prescriptions no clinical justification was documented. Antibiotic prescribing rates varied substantially between practices, suggesting that there is potential to reduce prescribing in at least some practices.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29490062