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© Christine Schmitt, Anubis Vega Rua, Jean-Marc Panaud
Tête de moustique femelle Aedes albopictus, vecteur du virus de la dengue et du chikungunya. Microphotographie électronique à balayage, image colorisée.
Publication : BMC infectious diseases

Aedes albopictus in Lebanon, a potential risk of arboviruses outbreak

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in BMC infectious diseases - 14 Nov 2012

Haddad N, Mousson L, Vazeille M, Chamat S, Tayeh J, Osta MA, Failloux AB

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 23151056

BMC Infect. Dis. 2012;12:300

BACKGROUND: The mosquito Aedes albopictus is undergoing a worldwide expansion with potential consequences on transmission of various arboviruses. This species has been first detected in Lebanon in 2003.

METHODS: We performed a phylogenetic study of Lebanese specimens and assessed their host preference by detecting human, cat, dog and chicken immunoglobulins in mosquito blood-meals. Their capacity to transmit arboviruses was investigated by providing infectious blood-meals using an artificial feeding system followed by detection of viral particles in mosquito saliva.

RESULTS: Our results suggest that Lebanese strains are part of the recent wave of Ae. albopictus expansion and are related to some European, African and North American strains. They exhibited a host preference towards humans and an important capacity to transmit arboviruses. Indeed, we showed that Ae. albopictus was able to transmit chikungunya (CHIKV), dengue (DENV) and West-Nile (WNV) viruses. At day 10 after an infectious blood-meal at a titer of 108 MID50/ml, 30% of mosquitoes delivered an average of 515 ± 781 viral particles of CHIKV in saliva collected using a forced salivation technique and 55% with an average of 245 ± 304 viral particles when infected with WNV. Whereas DENV was not found in saliva at day 10 post-infection (pi), an average of 174 ± 455 viral particles was detected in 38.1% of mosquitoes tested at day 21 after an infectious blood-meal at a higher titer of 109 MID50/ml.

CONCLUSION: These observations suggest that Ae. albopictus around Beirut is a potential vector of the three tested arboviruses.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23151056