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© A-M. Pais-Correia, M-I. Thoulouze, A. Alcover, A. Gessain
Mise en évidence de structures de type "biofilm ", formées par le rétrovirus HTLV-1 générés par des cellules infectées (cellules du haut), qui ont été transmis à un autre lymphocyte (cellule du bas). Micrographie en microscopie électronique à balayage. Image colorisée.
Publication : Current hematologic malignancy reports

Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and HTLV-1

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Current hematologic malignancy reports - 01 Oct 2007

Mahieux R, Gessain A

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 20425378

Curr Hematol Malig Rep 2007 Oct;2(4):257-64

Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first oncogenic human retrovirus to be discovered, more than 25 years ago. HTLV-1 infects 15 to 20 million individuals worldwide. This oncoretrovirus can be transmitted in three ways: horizontally (sexually), vertically (mother to child), and via blood transfusion. HTLV-1 causes two major diseases: adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). ATLL can be classified into four major subtypes: a smoldering type, a chronic type, a lymphoma type, and a leukemic type. Because of intrinsic chemoresistance and severe immunosuppression, the survival rate of ATLL patients, especially those who develop the acute leukemic or lymphoma forms, is very poor, and such clonal malignant CD4 expansion remains one of the most severe lymphoproliferations. This article discusses a number of recent treatments including antiretroviral therapy, aggressive chemotherapy, and allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation, as well as new drugs.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20425378