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© Thierry Blisnick & Philippe Bastin, Institut Pasteur
Bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei cell
Publication : Science advances

Adipose tissue parasite sequestration drives leptin production in mice and correlates with human cerebral malaria.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Science advances - 01 Mar 2021

Mejia P, Treviño-Villarreal JH, De Niz M, Meibalan E, Longchamp A, Reynolds JS, Turnbull LB, Opoka RO, Roussilhon C, Spielmann T, Ozaki CK, Heussler VT, Seydel KB, Taylor TE, John CC, Milner DA, Marti M, Mitchell JR,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 33762334

Link to DOI – eabe248410.1126/sciadv.abe2484

Sci Adv 2021 Mar; 7(13):

Circulating levels of the adipokine leptin are linked to neuropathology in experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), but its source and regulation mechanism remain unknown. Here, we show that sequestration of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) in white adipose tissue (WAT) microvasculature increased local vascular permeability and leptin production. Mice infected with parasite strains that fail to sequester in WAT displayed reduced leptin production and protection from ECM. WAT sequestration and leptin induction were lost in CD36KO mice; however, ECM susceptibility revealed sexual dimorphism. Adipocyte leptin was regulated by the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and blocked by rapamycin. In humans, although Plasmodium falciparum infection did not increase circulating leptin levels, iRBC sequestration, tissue leptin production, and mTORC1 activity were positively correlated with CM in pediatric postmortem WAT. These data identify WAT sequestration as a trigger for leptin production with potential implications for pathogenesis of malaria infection, prognosis, and treatment.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33762334