Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Thierry Blisnick & Philippe Bastin, Institut Pasteur
Bloodstream Trypanosoma brucei cell
Publication : Molecular microbiology

A role for the Plasmodium falciparum RESA protein in resistance against heat shock demonstrated using gene disruption

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Molecular microbiology - 01 May 2005

Silva MD, Cooke BM, Guillotte M, Buckingham DW, Sauzet JP, Le Scanf C, Contamin H, David P, Mercereau-Puijalon O, Bonnefoy S

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 15853885

Mol. Microbiol. 2005 May;56(4):990-1003

During erythrocyte invasion, the Plasmodium falciparum Ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA) establishes specific interactions with spectrin. Based on analysis of strains with a large chromosome 1 deletion, RESA has been assigned several functions, none of which is firmly established. Analysis of parasites with a disrupted resa1 gene and isogenic parental or resa3-disrupted controls confirmed the critical role of RESA in the surface reactivity of immune adult sera on glutaraldehyde-fixed ring stages. Absence of RESA did not influence merozoite invasion or erythrocyte membrane rigidity, was associated with a modest increase of cytoadhesion to CD36 under conditions of flow, but resulted in marked susceptibility to heat shock. resa1-KO-infected erythrocytes were prone to heat-induced vesiculation like uninfected erythrocytes, whereas parental or resa3-KO infected erythrocytes remained undamaged. Furthermore, a 6 h exposure of ring stages at 41 degrees C resulted in 33% culture inhibition of resa1-KO parasites while marginally impacting parental and resa3-KO parasite growth. This points to a role for RESA in protecting the infected erythrocyte cytoskeleton during febrile episodes. Infection patterns of resa1-KO and parental parasites in Saimiri sciureus indicated that RESA does not, at least on its own, modulate virulence in the squirrel monkey, as had been previously suggested.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15853885