Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Department Manager
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950)

A polysaccharide virulence factor of a human fungal pathogen induces neutrophil apoptosis via NK cells

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md. : 1950) - 30 Apr 2014

Robinet P, Baychelier F, Fontaine T, Picard C, Debré P, Vieillard V, Latgé JP, Elbim C

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 24790151

J. Immunol. 2014 Jun;192(11):5332-42

Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that sheds galactosaminogalactan (GG) into the environment. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and NK cells are both part of the first line of defense against pathogens. We recently reported that GG induces PMN apoptosis. In this study, we show that PMN apoptosis occurs via a new NK cell-dependent mechanism. Reactive oxygen species, induced by the presence of GG, play an indispensable role in this apoptotic effect by increasing MHC class I chain-related molecule A expression at the PMN surface. This increased expression enables interaction between MHC class I chain-related molecule A and NKG2D, leading to NK cell activation, which in turn generates a Fas-dependent apoptosis-promoting signal in PMNs. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the crosstalk between PMNs and NK cells is essential to GG-induced PMN apoptosis. NK cells might thus play a role in the induction of PMN apoptosis in situations such as unexplained neutropenia or autoimmune diseases.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24790151