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© Institut Pasteur/Antoinette Ryter
Salmonella spp. Bactéries à Gram négatif, aérobies ou anaérobies facultatifs à transmission orofécale. Les salmonelles majeures (sérotype typhi et sérotype paratyphi) sont responsables des fièvres typhoïde et paratyphoïde chez l'homme uniquement ; les salmonelles mineures (sérotype typhimurium et sérotype enteritidis) sont impliquées dans 30 à 60 % des gastroentérites et toxiinfections d'origine alimentaire. Image colorisée.
Publication : PLoS neglected tropical diseases

A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in PLoS neglected tropical diseases - 11 Feb 2016

Makendi C, Page AJ, Wren BW, Le Thi Phuong T, Clare S, Hale C, Goulding D, Klemm EJ, Pickard D, Okoro C, Hunt M, Thompson CN, Phu Huong Lan N, Tran Do Hoang N, Thwaites GE, Le Hello S, Brisabois A, Weill FX, Baker S, Dougan G

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 26867150

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2016 Feb;10(2):e0004446

Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden) is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26867150