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© Research
Publication : Journal of molecular biology

1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the differences in DNA deformation induced by anti-tumoral 7H-pyrido[4,3-c]carbazole dimers

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Journal of molecular biology - 01 Nov 1989

Delepierre M, Maroun R, Garbay-Jaureguiberry C, Igolen J, Roques BP

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 2585517

J. Mol. Biol. 1989 Nov;210(1):211-28

Ditercalinium (2,2′-[( 4,4′-bipiperidine]-1,1′-diyldi-2,1-ethane-diyl) bis-[10-methoxy-7H pyrido[4,3-c]carbazolium)tetramethane sulfonate (NSC 366241], a DNA bis-intercalating compound, is a potent anti-tumoral rigid dimer. Previous studies have shown that a reduced flexibility of the linking chain of such a dimer is essential for its biological activity. In order to understand, at the molecular level, the mechanism of action and the structure-activity relationships of this series of DNA intercalators, new dimers with additional methylene groups between the two piperidine rings have been synthesized. Addition of one methylene group in the chain preserved the activity, whereas addition of two methylene groups reduced the cytotoxicity, which finally disappeared when three methylene groups were inserted. Therefore, the study of the interaction of dimers bearing no (202), two (222) and three (232) methylene groups with the self-complementary hexanucleotide d(CGATCG)2 have been investigated by 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies. The results reported here indicate that all dimers bis-intercalate into the minihelix. The intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) between the dimers and the nucleotide lead to the conclusion that the three dimers intercalate with their rigid bis-ethyl bipiperidine chain fitting the major groove of the helix. Inter-residue nuclear Overhauser effects at the DNA level, as well as induced shifts, are discussed in relation to the conformational changes induced in DNA upon intercalation and to the different activity of the dimers.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2585517