Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Lydie Couturier , Institut Pasteur
Organes sensoriels en développement chez la drosophile
News

SEMINAR “Impact of endogenous retroviruses on the evolution of primate embryonic stem cells”

Friday 22th January — at 12.00 — Amphi Monod (Bât.66)

Invited Speaker : Guillaume Bourque

From  Assoc. Professor, Department of Human Genetics, McGill University,
Director of Bioinformatics, McGill University & Genome Quebec Innovation Center

 

Hosted by Pablo Navarro

Abstract : We studied the genomic locations of three key regulatory proteins (OCT4, NANOG and CTCF) in human and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. In contrast to CTCF, we found that the binding profiles of OCT4 and NANOG were drastically different with only ~5% of the regions homologously occupied. We showed that transposable elements, and in particular endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), have contributed up to 25% of the bound sites in both species and have wired new genes into the core regulatory network of ES cells. Additionally, we also reported that in human ES cells, the long terminal repeats of HERVH, a primate-specific ERV, function as enhancers. We also showed that HERVH is an expressed nuclear long noncoding RNA that associates with OCT4, co-activators and various mediator subunits, which is required to maintain human ES cell identity. Together, these results have revealed a new role of species-specific transposable elements in hESCs and indicate that species-specific ERVs have profoundly altered the transcriptional circuitry of ES cells. To further characterize the role of ERVs in the evolution of primate ES cells, we have recently been profiling the epigenome of various primate iPSCs including cells from gorilla, chimpanzee, rhesus and of course human. Using these data, we show the broad impact that ERVs have had on the transcriptional landscape of primate ES cells.