Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Shalin E. Abraham, Michael Häusser, Christoph Schmidt-Hieber, University College London
The dentate gyrus is one of the few mammalian brain regions where new neurons are generated throughout life. The image was taken with a confocal microscope from a parasagittal slice of the mouse hippocampus. Cells were labelled with fluorescent markers: Newly generated neurons are red (doublecortin), mature neurons are green (NeuN), and nuclei are blue (DAPI)
Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique
Date
29
Mar 2019
Time
11:30:00
25 Rue du Dr Roux, Paris, France
Address
Building: Fernbach (68) Room: Jean-Paul Aubert
Location
2019-03-29 11:30:00 2019-03-29 00:30:00 Europe/Paris Imaging neuronal activity on its own terms: multiphoton micron resolution across millimeters at the subsecond time scale Much of neural circuitry is buried deep in scattering tissue, beyond the reach of single-photon approaches. Thus, multiphoton imaging (usually two-photon or three-photon) is the leading way to image neural activity with micron resolution deep in the brain. Early […] 25 Rue du Dr Roux, Paris, France Christoph Schmidt-Hieber christoph.schmidt-hieber@pasteur.fr

About

Much of neural circuitry is buried deep in scattering tissue, beyond the reach of single-photon approaches. Thus, multiphoton imaging (usually two-photon or three-photon) is the leading way to image neural activity with micron resolution deep in the brain. Early multiphoton imaging systems were simply ultrafast lasers hooked up to standard microscopes. However, micron resolution of standard microscopes are limited to small fields of view. In the living brain, moment-to-moment neuronal dynamics occur at the subsecond time scale, and across millimeter length scales. Moreover, these imaging systems need to be compatible not with slides and petri dishes, but with living and behaving animals. We are developing novel multiphoton imaging technology to enable new neuroscience experiments. I will discuss our accomplishments to date, our latest unpublished work, and our plans for the future of multiphoton imaging in neuroscience.

Biography: Spencer LaVere Smith earned is his undergraduate degree in physics and mathematics (U Iowa), and his Ph.D in neuroscience and neuroengineering (UCLA). He did postdoctoral studies at UCLA and University College London. His lab (slslab.org) at the University of California Santa Barbara uses imaging, electrophysiology, and quantitative behavior to reverse engineer the neuronal activity dynamics that encode stimuli and guide behavior. The neuroengineering portion of his lab develops novel instrumentation, including multiphoton imaging systems, to measure and manipulate neuronal activity across multiple brain areas simultaneously with subcellular resolution. The neurobiology portion of his lab uses these tools to gain insights into neural circuitry. His work has been recognized by awards including a Human Frontier Science Program Career Development Award (2012), a Klingenstein Award (2013), a McKnight Technological Innovation Award (2015), and the Hettleman Prize (2017).

Location

Building: Fernbach (68)
Room: Jean-Paul Aubert
Address: 25 Rue du Dr Roux, Paris, France