Tapez votre recherche ici
  • Équipes
  • Membres
  • Projets
  • Événements
  • Appels
  • Emplois
  • publications
  • Logiciel
  • Outils
  • Réseau
  • Équipement

Un petit guide pour l'utilisation de la recherche avancée :

  • Tip 1. Utilisez "" afin de chercher une expression exacte.
    Exemple : "division cellulaire"
  • Tip 2. Utilisez + afin de rendre obligatoire la présence d'un mot.
    Exemple : +cellule +stem
  • Tip 3. Utilisez + et - afin de forcer une inclusion ou exclusion d'un mot.
    Exemple : +cellule -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Rechercher
Compteur
IN
OUT
Contenu 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche Expert
  • Directeur(trice) de Recherche
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Chercheur(euse) Clinicien(ne)
  • Manager de département
  • Professeur(e)
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Professeur Honoraire
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Pharmacien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Vétérinaire
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Plateforme
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable opérationnel et administratif
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Contenu 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Personnel Administratif
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche Expert
  • Directeur(trice) de Recherche
  • Assistant(e) de Recherche Clinique
  • Chercheur(euse) Clinicien(ne)
  • Manager de département
  • Professeur(e)
  • Etudiant(e) M2
  • Professeur Honoraire
  • Aide technique
  • Chercheur(euse) Contractuel(le)
  • Chercheur(euse) Permanent(e)
  • Pharmacien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e) en thèse
  • Médecin
  • Post-doctorant(e)
  • Chef(fe) de Projet
  • Chargé(e) de Recherche
  • Ingénieur(e) de Recherche
  • Chercheur(euse) Retraité(e)
  • Technicien(ne)
  • Etudiant(e)
  • Vétérinaire
  • Visiteur(euse) Scientifique
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Centre National de Référence
  • Directeur(trice) Adjoint(e) de Plateforme
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre
  • Directeur(trice) de Départment
  • Directeur(trice) d'Institut
  • Directeur(trice) de Centre National de Référence
  • Chef(fe) de Groupe
  • Responsable de Plateforme
  • Responsable opérationnel et administratif
  • Responsable de Structure
  • Président(e) d'honneur de Département
  • Coordinateur(trice) du Labex
Recherche
Revenir
Haut de page
Partagez
© Recherche
Publication : eLife

BiteOscope, an open platform to study mosquito biting behavior.

Domaines Scientifiques
Maladies
Organismes
Applications
Technique

Publié sur eLife - 22 Sep 2020

Hol FJ, Lambrechts L, Prakash M,

Lien vers Pubmed [PMID] – 32960173

Lien DOI – 10.7554/eLife.56829e56829

Elife 2020 09; 9():

Female mosquitoes need a blood meal to reproduce, and in obtaining this essential nutrient they transmit deadly pathogens. Although crucial for the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, blood feeding remains poorly understood due to technological limitations. Indeed, studies often expose human subjects to assess biting behavior. Here, we present the biteOscope, a device that attracts mosquitoes to a host mimic which they bite to obtain an artificial blood meal. The host mimic is transparent, allowing high-resolution imaging of the feeding mosquito. Using machine learning, we extract detailed behavioral statistics describing the locomotion, pose, biting, and feeding dynamics of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Anopheles stephensi, and Anopheles coluzzii. In addition to characterizing behavioral patterns, we discover that the common insect repellent DEET repels Anopheles coluzzii upon contact with their legs. The biteOscope provides a new perspective on mosquito blood feeding, enabling the high-throughput quantitative characterization of this lethal behavior.Scientists often sacrifice their own skin to study how mosquitos drink blood. They allow mosquitos to bite them in laboratory settings so they can observe the insects’ feeding behavior. By observing blood feeding, scientists hope to find ways to prevent deadly diseases like malaria, which is transmitted by bites from mosquitos carrying the malaria parasite. These studies are not only unpleasant for the volunteers, they also have important limitations. For example, it is too risky to use pathogen-infected mosquitos that could make the volunteers sick. A device called the biteOscope developed by Hol et al. may give scientists and their skin a reprieve. The device has a transparent skin-like covering that attracts mosquitos and supplies them an artificial blood meal when they bite. The device captures high-resolution images of the insects’ behavior. It is small enough to fit in a backpack when disassembled, costs about $900 to $3,500 US dollars, and is suitable for use in the laboratory or in the field. Using machine-learning techniques, Hol et al. also developed an automated system for analyzing the images. The researchers tested the device on four types of disease-transmitting mosquitos. In one set of experiments, Anopheles mosquitos were recorded interacting with a biteOscope partially coated with an insect repellent called DEET. The images captured by the biteOscope showed that the mosquitos are attracted to the warm surface and land on the part coated with DEET. But when their legs come in contact with the repellent, they leave. The biteOscope provides scientists a new way to study blood feeding, even in mosquitos infected with dangerous pathogens. It might also be used to test new ways to prevent mosquitos from biting and spreading disease. Because the device is portable and relatively inexpensive, it may enable larger studies in a variety of settings.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32960173