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© Research
Publication : American journal of epidemiology

Update on the State of the Science for Analytical Methods for Gene-Environment Interactions.

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in American journal of epidemiology - 01 Oct 2017

Gauderman WJ, Mukherjee B, Aschard H, Hsu L, Lewinger JP, Patel CJ, Witte JS, Amos C, Tai CG, Conti D, Torgerson DG, Lee S, Chatterjee N,

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 28978192

Link to DOI – 10.1093/aje/kwx228

Am J Epidemiol 2017 Oct; 186(7): 762-770

The analysis of gene-environment interaction (G×E) may hold the key for further understanding the etiology of many complex traits. The current availability of high-volume genetic data, the wide range in types of environmental data that can be measured, and the formation of consortiums of multiple studies provide new opportunities to identify G×E but also new analytical challenges. In this article, we summarize several statistical approaches that can be used to test for G×E in a genome-wide association study. These include traditional models of G×E in a case-control or quantitative trait study as well as alternative approaches that can provide substantially greater power. The latest methods for analyzing G×E with gene sets and with data in a consortium setting are summarized, as are issues that arise due to the complexity of environmental data. We provide some speculation on why detecting G×E in a genome-wide association study has thus far been difficult. We conclude with a description of software programs that can be used to implement most of the methods described in the paper.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28978192