Search anything and hit enter
  • Teams
  • Members
  • Projects
  • Events
  • Calls
  • Jobs
  • publications
  • Software
  • Tools
  • Network
  • Equipment

A little guide for advanced search:

  • Tip 1. You can use quotes "" to search for an exact expression.
    Example: "cell division"
  • Tip 2. You can use + symbol to restrict results containing all words.
    Example: +cell +stem
  • Tip 3. You can use + and - symbols to force inclusion or exclusion of specific words.
    Example: +cell -stem
e.g. searching for members in projects tagged cancer
Search for
Count
IN
OUT
Content 1
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Content 2
  • member
  • team
  • department
  • center
  • program_project
  • nrc
  • whocc
  • project
  • software
  • tool
  • patent
  • Administrative Staff
  • Assistant Professor
  • Associate Professor
  • Clinical Research Assistant
  • Full Professor
  • Graduate Student
  • Lab assistant
  • Non-permanent Researcher
  • Permanent Researcher
  • Pharmacist
  • PhD Student
  • Physician
  • Post-doc
  • Project Manager
  • Research Associate
  • Research Engineer
  • Retired scientist
  • Technician
  • Undergraduate Student
  • Veterinary
  • Visiting Scientist
  • Deputy Director of Center
  • Deputy Director of Department
  • Deputy Director of National Reference Center
  • Deputy Head of Facility
  • Director of Center
  • Director of Department
  • Director of Institute
  • Director of National Reference Center
  • Group Leader
  • Head of Facility
  • Head of Operations
  • Head of Structure
  • Honorary President of the Departement
  • Labex Coordinator
Search
Go back
Scroll to top
Share
© Research
Publication : Stem cells (Dayton, Ohio)

Transplantation of embryonic neural stem/precursor cells overexpressing BM88/Cend1 enhances the generation of neuronal cells in the injured mouse cortex

Scientific Fields
Diseases
Organisms
Applications
Technique

Published in Stem cells (Dayton, Ohio) - 01 Jan 2010

Makri G, Lavdas AA, Katsimpardi L, Charneau P, Thomaidou D, Matsas R

Link to Pubmed [PMID] – 19911428

Stem Cells 2010 Jan;28(1):127-39

The intrinsic inability of the central nervous system to efficiently repair traumatic injuries renders transplantation of neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) a promising approach towards repair of brain lesions. In this study, NPCs derived from embryonic day 14.5 mouse cortex were genetically modified via transduction with a lentiviral vector to overexpress the neuronal lineage-specific regulator BM88/Cend1 that coordinates cell cycle exit and differentiation of neuronal precursors. BM88/Cend1-overexpressing NPCs exhibiting enhanced differentiation into neurons in vitro were transplanted in a mouse model of acute cortical injury and analyzed in comparison with control NPCs. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that a smaller proportion of BM88/Cend1-overexpressing NPCs, as compared with control NPCs, expressed the neural stem cell marker nestin 1 day after transplantation, while the percentage of nestin-positive cells was significantly reduced thereafter in both types of cells, being almost extinct 1 week post-grafting. Both types of cells did not proliferate up to 4 weeks in vivo, thus minimizing the risk of tumorigenesis. In comparison with control NPCs, Cend1-overexpressing NPCs generated more neurons and less glial cells 1 month after transplantation in the lesioned cortex whereas the majority of graft-derived neurons were identified as GABAergic interneurons. Furthermore, transplantation of Cend1-overexpressing NPCs resulted in a marked reduction of astrogliosis around the lesioned area as compared to grafts of control NPCs. Our results suggest that transplantation of Cend1-overexpressing NPCs exerts beneficial effects on tissue regeneration by enhancing the number of generated neurons and restricting the formation of astroglial scar, in a mouse model of cortical brain injury.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19911428